Professional & Clinical Practice Overview

Professional and Clinical Practice

Clinical Practice

Clinical practice is defined as a model of practice that involves those activities with and on behalf of clients, especially those activities completed in the client’s presence and with the client’s collaboration. These activities are informed by an ecologically based biopsychosocial assessment. These interventive and change oriented activities are based on a range of theories with the clinical social worker selecting the one most appropriate for the client’s situation. These activities may take place in an individual, family, or group setting. While focusing on those activities done in direct contact with clients, clinical social workers must also be prepared to make indirect contacts on behalf of clients. Those contact functions include advocacy, consultation, referral, and supervision. All social workers, including clinical social workers, must be aware of the impact of social policies upon their clients, and as citizens knowledgeably engage in the democratic process in common struggle for economic and social justice.

Professional Practice

A common definition of professional practice or professionalism is a decision to acquire and exude knowledge and skills in a chosen field. Knowledge and skills in professional practice are reinforced by other attributes including: accountability, workplace etiquette, communication, performance excellence, leadership and respect.

CIRRIE: Monograph Series-The Rehabilitation Provider's Guide to Cultures of the Foreign-Born
Links
21289

Description: 

CIRRIE has developed a thirteen-volume monograph series, The Rehabilitation Provider's Guide to Cultures of the Foreign-Born, which provides specific information on cultural perspectives of foreign-born persons in the U.S., especially recent immigrants. The monographs contain specific information about culture that rehabilitation service providers can use to more effectively meet the needs of foreign-born recipients of rehabilitation services.

The monographs focus on the top ten countries of origin of the foreign-born population in the United States, according to the U.S. Census Bureau: Mexico, China, Philippines, India, Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Korea, El Salvador, Jamaica, and Cuba. There are additional monographs on the culture of Haiti and the Muslim perspective. Each monograph contains general information about the culture, its values and recommended ways to interact with persons from that culture. There is also specific information about how disability and rehabilitation are viewed in each culture. The monographs are concise and written in non-technical language, to insure that they are user-friendly for busy rehabilitation service providers.

The series also contains an initial introductory monograph, Culture Brokering: Providing Culturally Competent Rehabilitation Services to Foreign-Born Persons. This monograph explains the role of the rehabilitation provider as a "culture broker." Practical information, such as general outreach strategies, actions needed to become familiar and trusted by other cultures, the importance of understanding our own culture, and how to use translators effectively, are also included.

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Data-Based Planning for Effective Prevention
Links
25822

Description: 

Presents the key principles and core expectations of the State Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroups, designed to use data to inform and enhance state and community decisions regarding substance abuse and mental health disorder prevention programs.

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Talking With Your Older Patient: A Clinician's Handbook
Links
24636

Description: 

This essential guide for health professionals offers strategies for communicating effectively with older patients. Among the topics addressed in this 61-page publication are how to talk about sensitive issues, give bad news, and be aware of cultural differences.

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Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide (Third Edition)
Links
21308

Description: 

This 12/2012 reviosion of the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment presents research-based principles of addiction treatment for a variety of drugs, including nicotine, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs, that can inform drug treatment programs and services.

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Data-Based Planning for Effective Prevention
Links
25822

Description: 

Presents the key principles and core expectations of the State Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroups, designed to use data to inform and enhance state and community decisions regarding substance abuse and mental health disorder prevention programs.

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Behavioral Health Homes for People with Mental Health & Substance Use Conditions: The Core Clinical Features
Links
24771

Description: 

Helps prepare behavioral health provider organizations to become health homes by outlining the essential clinical features. In addition, the paper introduces several real-world examples of how behavioral health provider organizations are successfully implementing the clinical features of a health homes around the country.

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Review of the application of positive psychology to substance use, addiction, and recovery research.
Links
25610

Description: 

A review of research findings: "The contemporary recovery movement in addictions and the positive psychology movement in the broader field of psychological health have recently grown in prominence but almost entirely in parallel streams, yet the overlaps and possible synergies between them suggest that an integration could be a step forward in recovery from addiction."

Resource Types:

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CIRRIE: Monograph Series-The Rehabilitation Provider's Guide to Cultures of the Foreign-Born
Links
21289

Description: 

CIRRIE has developed a thirteen-volume monograph series, The Rehabilitation Provider's Guide to Cultures of the Foreign-Born, which provides specific information on cultural perspectives of foreign-born persons in the U.S., especially recent immigrants. The monographs contain specific information about culture that rehabilitation service providers can use to more effectively meet the needs of foreign-born recipients of rehabilitation services.

The monographs focus on the top ten countries of origin of the foreign-born population in the United States, according to the U.S. Census Bureau: Mexico, China, Philippines, India, Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Korea, El Salvador, Jamaica, and Cuba. There are additional monographs on the culture of Haiti and the Muslim perspective. Each monograph contains general information about the culture, its values and recommended ways to interact with persons from that culture. There is also specific information about how disability and rehabilitation are viewed in each culture. The monographs are concise and written in non-technical language, to insure that they are user-friendly for busy rehabilitation service providers.

The series also contains an initial introductory monograph, Culture Brokering: Providing Culturally Competent Rehabilitation Services to Foreign-Born Persons. This monograph explains the role of the rehabilitation provider as a "culture broker." Practical information, such as general outreach strategies, actions needed to become familiar and trusted by other cultures, the importance of understanding our own culture, and how to use translators effectively, are also included.

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Help Patients Understand [from AMA Health Literacy Tool Kit]: Checklist for patient-friendly Office Procedures
Links
21287

Description: 

The Health Literacy and Patient Safety: Help Patients Understand educational kit is the AMA Foundation's primary tool for informing physicians, health care professionals and patient advocates about health literacy.

The enclosed materials will enable physicians to:
• Define the scope of the health literacy problem.
• Recognize health system barriers faced by patients with low literacy.
• Implement improved methods of verbal and written communication.
• Incorporate practical strategies to create a shame-free environment.

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