Drugs Overview

Opioids or Opiates

Opioids are medications that relieve pain. They reduce the intensity of pain signals reaching the brain and affect those brain areas controlling emotion, which diminishes the effects of a painful stimulus. Medications that fall within this class include hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin), oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin, Percocet), morphine (e.g., Kadian, Avinza), codeine, and related drugs. Hydrocodone products are the most commonly prescribed for a variety of painful conditions, including dental and injury-related pain. Morphine is often used before and after surgical procedures to alleviate severe pain. Codeine, on the other hand, is often prescribed for mild pain. In addition to their painrelieving properties, some of these drugs—codeine and diphenoxylate (Lomotil) for example—can be used to relieve coughs and severe diarrhea.

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Stimulants

Stimulants speed up the body’s systems. This class of drugs includes prescription drugs like amphetamines [Adderall® and Dexedrine®], methylphenidate [Concerta® and Ritalin®]; diet aids [such as Didrex®, Bontril®, Preludin®, Fastin®, Adipex P®, Ionomin® and Meridia®] and illicitly produced drugs such as methamphetamine, cocaine and methcathinone).

Street names

Bennies, Black Beauties, Cat, Coke, Crank, Crystal, Flake, Ice,Pellets, R-Ball, Skippy, Snow, Speed, Uppers, Vitamin R

Methods of abuse

Stimulants can be pills or capsules that are swallowed. Smoking, snorting, or injecting stimulants produces a sudden sensation known as a "rush" or a "flash." Abuse is often associated with a pattern of binge use—sporadically consuming large doses of stimulants over a short period of time. Heavy users may inject themselves every few hours, continuing until they have depleted their drug supply or reached a point of delirium, psychosis, and physical exhaustion. During this period of heavy use, all other interests become secondary to re-creating the initial euphoric rush.

Affect on mind

When used as drugs of abuse and not under a doctor’s supervision, stimulants are frequently taken to produce a sense of exhilaration, enhance self esteem, improve mental and physical performance, increase activity, reduce appetite, extend wakefulness for prolonged periods and to "get high." Chronic, high-dose use is frequently associated with agitation, hostility, panic, aggression, and suicidal or homicidal tendencies. Paranoia, sometimes accompanied by both auditory and visual hallucinations, may also occur. Tolerance, in which more and more drug is needed to produce the usual effects, can develop rapidly, and psychological dependence occurs. In fact, the strongest psychological dependence observed occurs with the more potent stimulants, such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, methamphetamine, cocaine and methcathinone. Abrupt cessation is commonly followed by depression, anxiety, drug craving, and extreme fatigue, known as a "crash."

Affect on body

Stimulants are sometimes referred to as uppers and reverse the effects of fatigue on both mental and physical tasks. Therapeutic levels of stimulants can produce exhilaration, extended wakefulness, and loss of appetite. These effects are greatly intensified when large doses of stimulants are taken. Taking too large a dose at one time or taking large doses over an extended period of time may cause such physical side effects as dizziness, tremors, headache, flushed skin, chest pain with palpitations, excessive sweating, vomiting and abdominal cramps.

Overdose effects

Overdose effects include agitation, increased body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, and possible death.

Source: US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
Hallucinogens

Hallucinogenic compounds found in some plants and mushrooms (or their extracts) have been used—mostly during religious rituals—for centuries. Almost all hallucinogens contain nitrogen and are classified as alkaloids. Many hallucinogens have chemical structures similar to those of natural neurotransmitters (e.g., acetylcholine-, serotonin-, or catecholamine-like). While the exact mechanisms by which hallucinogens exert their effects remain unclear, research suggests that these drugs work, at least partially, by temporarily interfering with neurotransmitter action or by binding to their receptor sites. This DrugFacts will discuss four common types of hallucinogens:

·       LSD (d-lysergic acid diethylamide) is one of the most potent mood-changing chemicals. It was discovered in 1938 and is manufactured from lysergic acid, which is found in ergot, a fungus that grows on rye and other grains.

·       Peyote is a small, spineless cactus in which the principal active ingredient is mescaline. This plant has been used by natives in northern Mexico and the southwestern United States as a part of religious ceremonies. Mescaline can also be produced through chemical synthesis.

·       Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is obtained from certain types of mushrooms that are indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions of South America, Mexico, and the United States. These mushrooms typically contain less than 0.5 percent psilocybin plus trace amounts of psilocin, another hallucinogenic substance.

·       PCP (phencyclidine) was developed in the 1950s as an intravenous anesthetic. Its use has since been discontinued due to serious adverse effects.

 

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Illegal Drugs

When people talk about a "drug problem" they usually mean abusing legal drugs or using illegal drugs, such as marijuana, ecstasy,cocaine, LSD, crystal meth, and heroin (Marijuana is generally an illegal drug, but some states allow doctors to recommend it to adults for certain illnesses.)

Why Are Illegal Drugs Dangerous?

Illegal drugs aren't good for anyone, but they are particularly bad for a kid or teen whose body is still growing. Illegal drugs can damage the brain, heart, and other important organs. Cocaine, for instance, can cause a heart attack — even in a kid or teen.

While using drugs, people are also less able to do well in school, sports, and other activities. It's often harder to think clearly and make good decisions. People can do dumb or dangerous things that could hurt them — or other people — when they use drugs.

Why Do People Use Illegal Drugs?

Sometimes kids and teens try drugs to fit in with a group of friends. Or they might be curious or just bored. Someone may use illegal drugs for many reasons, but often because they help the person escape from reality for a while. A drug might — temporarily — make someone who is sad or upset feel better or forget about problems. But this escape lasts only until the drug wears off.

Drugs don't solve problems, of course. And using drugs often causes other problems on top of the problems the person had in the first place. Somebody who uses drugs can become dependent on them, or addicted. This means that the person's body becomes so accustomed to having this drug that he or she can't function well without it. Once someone is addicted, it's very hard to stop taking drugs. Stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms, such as vomiting(throwing up), sweating, and tremors (shaking). These sick feelings continue until the person's body gets adjusted to being drug free again. Can I Tell If Someone Is Using Drugs? If someone is using drugs, you might notice changes in how the person looks or acts. Here are some of those signs, but it's important to remember that depression or another problem could be causing these changes.

Somebody using drugs might:

  • lose interest in school
  • change friends (to hang out with kids who use drugs)
  • become moody, negative, cranky, or worried all the time
  • ask to be left alone a lot
  • have trouble concentrating
  • sleep a lot (maybe even in class)
  • get in fights
  • have red or puffy eyes
  • lose or gain weight
  • cough a lot
  • have a runny nose all of the time
Source: Reviewed by Mary L. Gavin, MD
Depressants

What They Are: Tranquilizers and other depressants calm nerves and relax muscles. They are bright-colored capsules or tablets that are legally available through a doctor for medical reasons, but can be illegally abused.

Sometimes Called: downers, goofballs, barbs, blue devils, yellow jackets, ludes

How They're Used: Depressants are swallowed.

What They Do to You: When used as prescribed (given) by a doctor, depressants can calm nerves and relax muscles. Larger or improperly used doses of depressant drugs can cause confusion, lack of coordination, low blood pressure, and slowed heart rate and breathing. Someone who takes them may have slurred speech and an inability to concentrate, and he or she may fall asleep at work or school. Depressants are addictive and withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, sleeplessness, and seizures. Depressant drugs are very dangerous if taken with alcohol and certain other drugs. Very large doses of depressant drugs can stop your breathing and kill you.

Source: Reviewed by Mary L. Gavin, MD
Inhalants

Many products readily found in the home or workplace—such as spray paints, markers, glues, and cleaning fluids—contain volatile substances that have psychoactive (mind-altering) properties when inhaled. People do not typically think of these products as drugs because they were never intended for that purpose. However, these products are sometimes abused in that way. They are especially (but not exclusively) abused by young children and adolescents, and are the only class of substance abused more by younger than by older teens.

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Ecstasy

MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine), popularly known as ecstasy or, more recently, as Molly, is a synthetic, psychoactive drug that has similarities to both the stimulant amphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. It produces feelings of increased energy, euphoria, emotional warmth and empathy toward others, and distortions in sensory and time perception.

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Club Drugs

The term club drug refers to a wide variety of dangerous drugs. These drugs are often used by young adults at all-night dance parties, dance clubs and bars. They include

  • Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, Adam, Clarity and Lover's Speed
  • Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as Grievous Bodily Harm, G, Liquid Ecstasy and Georgia Home Boy
  • Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, Cat Valium
  • Rohypnol, also known as Roofies, Rophies, Roche, Forget-me Pill
  • Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, Fire, Glass
  • Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also known as or Acid, Boomers, Yellow Sunshines

Club drugs have become more common in recent years. Sometimes people use them to commit sexual assaults. Club drugs can cause serious health problems and sometimes death. They are even more dangerous if you use them with alcohol.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Prescription Drug Abuse

Most people take medicines only for the reasons their doctors prescribe them. But an estimated 20 percent of people in the United States have used prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons. This is prescription drug abuse. It is a serious and growing problem.

Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. You can develop an addiction to:

  • Narcotic painkillers
  • Sedatives and tranquilizers
  • Stimulants

Experts don't know exactly why this type of drug abuse is increasing. The availability of drugs is probably one reason. Doctors are prescribing more drugs for more health problems than ever before. Online pharmacies make it easy to get prescription drugs without a prescription, even for youngsters.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Over-the-Counter Medicines

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription. Some OTC medicines relieve aches, pains and itches. Some prevent or cure diseases, like tooth decay and athlete's foot. Others help manage recurring problems, like migraines.

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration decides whether a medicine is safe enough to sell over-the-counter. Taking OTC medicines still has risks. Some interact with other medicines, supplements, foods or drinks. Others cause problems for people with certain medical conditions. If you're pregnant, talk to your health care provider before taking any medicines.

It is important to take medicines correctly. More medicine does not necessarily mean better. You should never take OTC medicines longer or in higher doses than the label recommends. If your symptoms don't go away, it’s a clear signal that it's time to see your healthcare provider.

Food and Drug Administration

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine is a very addictive stimulant drug. It can be smoked, injected, inhaled or taken by mouth. It has many street names, such as speed, meth, and chalk. Methamphetamine hydrochloride, the crystal form inhaled by smoking, is referred to as ice, crystal, glass and tina.

Methamphetamine affects the brain and can create feelings of pleasure, increase energy and elevate mood. Abusers may become addicted quickly, needing higher doses more often. Adverse health effects include irregular heartbeat, increased blood pressure and a variety of psychological problems. Long-term effects may include severe mental disorders, memory loss and severe dental problems.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Marijuana

Marijuana is a dry, shredded mix of flowers, stems, seeds and leaves of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. People usually smoke it as a cigarette or in a pipe. It is the most commonly abused illegal drug in the United States.

Abusing marijuana can result in problems with memory, learning and social behavior. It can interfere with family, school, work and other activities.

Scientific studies are underway to test the safety and usefulness of cannabis compounds for treating certain medical conditions. Currently, smoking marijuana is not recommended for the treatment of any disease or condition.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Hormones

Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work slowly, over time, and affect many different processes, including

 

  • Growth and development
  • Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat
  • Sexual function
  • Reproduction
  • Mood

Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries.

Hormones are powerful. It takes only a tiny amount to cause big changes in cells or even your whole body. That is why too much or too little of a certain hormone can be serious. Laboratory tests can measure the hormone levels in your blood, urine or saliva. Your health care provider may perform these tests if you have symptoms of a hormone disorder. Home pregnancy tests are similar - they test for pregnancy hormones in your urine.

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Heroin

Heroin is a drug made from morphine, a natural substance in the seedpod of the Asian poppy plant. Heroin usually appears as a white or brown powder. Heroin can be injected, smoked or snorted. Heroin abuse is a serious problem in the United States. Major health problems from heroin include miscarriages, heart infections and death from overdose. People who inject the drug also risk infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS and hepatitis.

Regular use of heroin can lead to tolerance. This means users need more and more drug to have the same effect. At higher doses over time, the body becomes dependent on heroin. If dependent users stop heroin, they have withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms include restlessness, muscle and bone pain, diarrhea, vomiting and cold flashes.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Cocaine

Cocaine is a powerful drug that stimulates the brain. People who use it can form a strong addiction. They may have to use more and more of the drug to get high. It's sold on the street as a fine, white powder. There are two forms of cocaine: hydrochloride salt and freebase. The salt dissolves in water. People can take it in a vein or in the nose. The freebase form can be smoked. Crack is the street name of a smokable form of cocaine.

No matter how cocaine is taken, it is dangerous. Some of the most common serious problems include

  • Heart problems, including heart attacks
  • Respiratory effects, including respiratory failure
  • Nervous system problems, including strokes
  • Digestive problems

Any of these can be fatal. Using cocaine with alcohol is a common cause of drug-related death.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Alcohol

If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking is probably safe. It may even have health benefits, including reducing your risk of certain heart problems. Moderate drinking is one drink a day for women or anyone over 65, and two drinks a day for men under 65.

Some people should not drink at all, including alcoholics, children, pregnant women, people on certain medicines and people with some medical conditions. If you have questions about whether it is safe for you to drink, speak with your healthcare provider.

Anything more than moderate drinking can be risky. Binge drinking - drinking five or more drinks at one time - can damage your health and increase your risk for accidents, injuries and assault. Years of heavy drinking can lead to liver disease, heart disease, cancer and pancreatitis. It can also cause problems at home, at work and with friends.

NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
Anabolic Steroids

Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Medical uses of anabolic steroids include some hormone problems in men, late puberty and muscle loss from some diseases.

Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. But using them this way is not legal or safe. Abuse of anabolic steroids has been linked with many health problems. They range from unattractive to life threatening and include

  • Acne and cysts
  • Breast growth and shrinking of testicles in men
  • Voice deepening and growth of body hair in women
  • Heart problems, including heart attack
  • Liver disease, including cancer
  • Aggressive behavior

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Source: NIH: MedlinePlus
The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology Through the Study of Addiction
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25821

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Equips teachers and students in grades 9 through 12 with interactive curriculum on the neurobiology of the brain as a result of drug abuse and addiction.

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Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Prog: Grades 2-3 DVD
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25820

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Provides a science program for students in grades 2–3 to educate them about their brains, why they should protect them, and how drugs such as nicotine and inhalants can hurt their brains. Includes six modules, a teacher’s guide, a parent’s guide, and a DVD.

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Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Prog: Grades 4-5 DVD
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25809

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Offers an interactive science education program for students in grades 4–5 to explore the human brain and the effects of drugs on the brain. Includes six modules, a teacher’s guide, parent newsletter, DVD, and poster.

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Brain Power! Challenge Grade 6-9: Science-Based Drug Abuse Information for Students
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Offers an interactive science education program for students in grades 6–9 about the brain and the effects of drugs on the body. Includes six modules, a teacher’s guide, a parent newsletter, and a CD-Rom.

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Just Think Twice: Teacher's Guide to www.justhinktwice.com for High School Students
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The Just Think Twice Web site (www.justthinktwice.com), developed by the Drug
Enforcement Administration (DEA), is a resource for teens that provides accurate
information about drugs—with the hope that this information will serve as the basis for
healthy decisions. The DEA is a government agency that enforces laws and regulations
relating to the production and distribution of drugs in the United States. Another mission
of the DEA is to discourage drug use among the U.S. population by sharing information
about the risks of drug use and the effects of drugs on society.

The Just Think Twice Teacher’s Guide provides lesson plans for students in grades 9-12
based on the Web site. The guide includes a module for each main section of the Web
site, an introductory module that introduces students to the site, and follow-on modules
that accompany specific sections. Every module of the Teacher’s Guide provides stepby-
step instructions for how to conduct a lesson related to that section of the Web site
within your class.

Overall, this program encourages students to think critically about the messages they
hear about drugs through the media or from peers. In particular, this program challenges
the idea that drugs are harmless and reinforces the societal benefits of enforcing laws
against drugs. Through this program, you can work with your students to help them learn
the truth about drugs, enabling them to make healthy decisions in the future.

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The Health Impact of Marijuana Across the Life Span
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Sharp rise in emergency department visits involving ADHD medications
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A new report shows that the number of emergency department visits involving attention deficit /hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant medications more than doubled from 13,379 visits in 2005 to 31,244 in 2010. The study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) finds that the greatest rates of increase in emergency department visits involving ADHD stimulant medications occurred among those aged 18 and older, while the level among those under 18 remained largely unchanged during this period.

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Number of U.S. Emergency Department Visits Involving Buprenorphine Increases Nearly Ten-Fold from 2005 to 2010
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"The estimated number of emergency department visits in which buprenorphine was involved as either a direct cause or a contributing factor increased from 3,161 in 2005 to 30,135 in 2010...More than half (52%) of these buprenorphine-related emergency department (ED) visits were for the nonmedical use of pharmaceuticals."

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The Parent Advisor, Issue 10: Understanding New Marijuana Terminology
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Government Studying How Marijuana Affects Drivers
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ER Visits Involving Sleep Drug Overmedication Almost Doubles
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Opioids or Opiates
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Description: 

Opioids are medications that relieve pain. They reduce the intensity of pain signals reaching the brain and affect those brain areas controlling emotion, which diminishes the effects of a painful stimulus. Medications that fall within this class include hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin), oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin, Percocet), morphine (e.g., Kadian, Avinza), codeine, and related drugs. Hydrocodone products are the most commonly prescribed for a variety of painful conditions, including dental and injury-related pain. Morphine is often used before and after surgical procedures to alleviate severe pain. Codeine, on the other hand, is often prescribed for mild pain. In addition to their painrelieving properties, some of these drugs—codeine and diphenoxylate (Lomotil) for example—can be used to relieve coughs and severe diarrhea.

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Speak Now
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Learn About Marijuana
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Drugs: Shatter the Myths
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"Drug Facts: Shatter the Myths" Q&A booklet answers teens' most frequently asked questions about drugs and drug abuse. A must-have resource for every teen!

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DEA Temporarily Classifies Synthetic Marijuana as a Schedule I Drug
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This is an updated compilation of the most recent research and survey results put together by the Center for Substance Abuse Research on synthetic marijuana.

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Illegal Drugs
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Description: 

When people talk about a "drug problem" they usually mean abusing legal drugs or using illegal drugs, such as marijuana, ecstasy,cocaine, LSD, crystal meth, and heroin (Marijuana is generally an illegal drug, but some states allow doctors to recommend it to adults for certain illnesses.)

Why Are Illegal Drugs Dangerous?

Illegal drugs aren't good for anyone, but they are particularly bad for a kid or teen whose body is still growing. Illegal drugs can damage the brain, heart, and other important organs. Cocaine, for instance, can cause a heart attack — even in a kid or teen.

While using drugs, people are also less able to do well in school, sports, and other activities. It's often harder to think clearly and make good decisions. People can do dumb or dangerous things that could hurt them — or other people — when they use drugs.

Why Do People Use Illegal Drugs?

Sometimes kids and teens try drugs to fit in with a group of friends. Or they might be curious or just bored. Someone may use illegal drugs for many reasons, but often because they help the person escape from reality for a while. A drug might — temporarily — make someone who is sad or upset feel better or forget about problems. But this escape lasts only until the drug wears off.

Drugs don't solve problems, of course. And using drugs often causes other problems on top of the problems the person had in the first place. Somebody who uses drugs can become dependent on them, or addicted. This means that the person's body becomes so accustomed to having this drug that he or she can't function well without it. Once someone is addicted, it's very hard to stop taking drugs. Stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms, such as vomiting(throwing up), sweating, and tremors (shaking). These sick feelings continue until the person's body gets adjusted to being drug free again. Can I Tell If Someone Is Using Drugs? If someone is using drugs, you might notice changes in how the person looks or acts. Here are some of those signs, but it's important to remember that depression or another problem could be causing these changes.

Somebody using drugs might:

  • lose interest in school
  • change friends (to hang out with kids who use drugs)
  • become moody, negative, cranky, or worried all the time
  • ask to be left alone a lot
  • have trouble concentrating
  • sleep a lot (maybe even in class)
  • get in fights
  • have red or puffy eyes
  • lose or gain weight
  • cough a lot
  • have a runny nose all of the time

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Choices
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Marijuana and Public Health Symposium: Introductions
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Marijuana and Public Health Symposium: Marijuana 101
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Marijuana and Public Health Symposium: Marijuana & Cancer
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