Crime, Courts & Substance Abuse Overview

Crime, Courts and Substance Abuse

Drug-related crime

In 2004, 17% of state prisoners and 18% of federal inmates said they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. These percentages represent a slight increase for federal prisoners (16% in 1997) and a slight decrease for state prisoners (19% in 1997).

In 2002 about a quarter of convicted property and drug offenders in local jails had committed their crimes to get money for drugs, compared to 5% of violent and public order offenders. Among state prisoners in 2004 the pattern was similar, with property (30%) and drug offenders (26%) more likely to commit their crimes for drug money than violent (10%) and public-order offenders (7%). In federal prisons property offenders (11%) were less than half as likely as drug offenders (25%) to report drug money as a motive in their offenses.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from Bureau of Justice Statistics, http://www.bjs.gov/content/dcf/duc.cfm

Specialized & Problem Solving Courts

Problem solving courts, such as drug courts, differ from traditional courts in that they are specially designed court calendars or dockets dedicated to addressing one type of offense or offender. These court-based interventions may focus on substance abuse, mental health, and other criminogenic issues. Typically, the judge plays a key supervisory role, and other criminal justice components (such as probation) and social services agencies (such as substance abuse treatment) collaborate on case management.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from National Institute of Justice, http://www.crimesolutions.gov/TopicDetails.aspx?ID=49

Treatment

Substance abuse treatment may be provided in a variety of settings, including on an outpatient basis, in residential treatment, or while in confinement (for offenders). In many cases, substance abuse treatment is intended to address co-occurring disorders, such as mental illness. Treatment generally involves some type of therapeutic services provided over a sustained period of time, which may address issues such as motivation, problem solving, and developing skills to resist substance abuse and other problem behaviors.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from National Institute of Justice, http://www.crimesolutions.gov/TopicDetails.aspx?ID=59

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics
Uniform Crime Reports (UCR)
Links
24796

Description: 

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program was conceived to meet a need for reliable, uniform crime statistics for the nation. Several annual statistical publications, such as the comprehensive Crime in the United States, are produced from data provided by nearly 17,000 law enforcement agencies across the United States. Includes indicators on Property Crime Rates and Violent Crime Rates.

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Crime, Courts and Substance Abuse
Links
27168

Description: 

Drug-related crime

In 2004, 17% of state prisoners and 18% of federal inmates said they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. These percentages represent a slight increase for federal prisoners (16% in 1997) and a slight decrease for state prisoners (19% in 1997).

In 2002 about a quarter of convicted property and drug offenders in local jails had committed their crimes to get money for drugs, compared to 5% of violent and public order offenders. Among state prisoners in 2004 the pattern was similar, with property (30%) and drug offenders (26%) more likely to commit their crimes for drug money than violent (10%) and public-order offenders (7%). In federal prisons property offenders (11%) were less than half as likely as drug offenders (25%) to report drug money as a motive in their offenses.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from Bureau of Justice Statistics, http://www.bjs.gov/content/dcf/duc.cfm

Specialized & Problem Solving Courts

Problem solving courts, such as drug courts, differ from traditional courts in that they are specially designed court calendars or dockets dedicated to addressing one type of offense or offender. These court-based interventions may focus on substance abuse, mental health, and other criminogenic issues. Typically, the judge plays a key supervisory role, and other criminal justice components (such as probation) and social services agencies (such as substance abuse treatment) collaborate on case management.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from National Institute of Justice, http://www.crimesolutions.gov/TopicDetails.aspx?ID=49

Treatment

Substance abuse treatment may be provided in a variety of settings, including on an outpatient basis, in residential treatment, or while in confinement (for offenders). In many cases, substance abuse treatment is intended to address co-occurring disorders, such as mental illness. Treatment generally involves some type of therapeutic services provided over a sustained period of time, which may address issues such as motivation, problem solving, and developing skills to resist substance abuse and other problem behaviors.

Information accessed 12/30/2013 from National Institute of Justice, http://www.crimesolutions.gov/TopicDetails.aspx?ID=59

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Combatting Illicit Drugs: DEA and ICE Interagency Agreement Has Helped to Ensure Better Coordination of Drug Investigations
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21364

Description: 

This report addresses the extent to which DEA and ICE have taken actions (1) to implement the Agreement’s cross-designation, deconfliction, and information-sharing provisions and (2) to monitor implementation of the Agreement and make needed adjustments.

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Free Publications

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Principles of Drug Abuse Treatment for Criminal Justice Populations - A Research-Based Guide
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25582

Description: 

Presents research-based principles of addiction treatment that can inform drug treatment programs and services in the criminal justice setting.

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Addiction and the Justice System: Deciphering the Maze
Alcohol and Drug Treatment